Most frequently asked questions about Refractive Lens Exchange RLE cataract surgery alternative in St. Louis, Missouri.

Will I experience halos and/or glare after my procedure?

Early after a vision correction procedure it is common to see halos and glare, particularly around lights at night. Our patients say that this is prominent at first, then dissipates over time to the point where it either completely goes away or is less noticeable. Glasses and contacts often have

Will I experience halos and/or glare after my procedure? 2017-11-28T13:21:52+00:00

What kind of lasers do you use?

As the only practice in St. Louis with multiple femtosecond and excimer laser platforms under one roof, we are better equipped to customize treatment options. We utilize the following lasers: VISX S4 IR This is one of our two excimer lasers. More LASIK cases have been done on the VISX laser than on any other laser in the world. It is also the laser approved for use in U.S. fighter pilots and NASA astronauts. Allegretto Wavelight This is the second of our two excimer lasers used for LASIK. The Allegretto Wavelight laser is the fastest excimer laser in the country (the Schwind laser is the fastest excimer laser in the world). Zeiss Visumax — 500 Hz This is one of our two femtosecond lasers. A femtosecond is one quadrillionth of a second. This is our newest laser and is the fastest femtosecond laser in the world, firing at 500Hz. It is also the only laser in the world that can do SMILE, a third-generation laser vision correction procedure. SMILE is a 100 percent femtosecond laser-based procedure. Yag laser This is a laser that we can use with Visian ICL and RLE surgery.

What kind of lasers do you use? 2017-09-11T06:08:12+00:00

What about macular degeneration?

In its early “dry” stages, macular degeneration can be mild and not bothersome. In its advanced “wet” stages it can be devastating and can even lead to blindness. We recommend contacting a retina specialist in your community if you are seeking treatment for macular degeneration.

What about macular degeneration? 2017-08-07T08:07:50+00:00

Why do I have to remove my contacts before my exam and before surgery?

Contact lenses can alter the shape of your cornea and can also prohibit oxygen flow to the cornea. For that reason, we ask that you refrain from wearing them both before your Brinton Vision Ocular Analysis (BVOA) and before surgery. Soft lenses should be removed three days before your exam, and seven days prior if you wear toric lenses. If you wear rigid gas-permeable or hybrid lenses, leave them out at least 30 days prior to your exam. This is so that your cornea can be restored to a more natural shape before measurements are taken.

Why do I have to remove my contacts before my exam and before surgery? 2017-08-07T08:53:14+00:00

Will you correct both eyes at the same time?

Most of the time we will correct both eyes at the same sitting, but there are a few exceptions. Refractive Lens Exchange (RLE) and Implantable Collamer Lenses (ICLs), sometimes called implantable contact lenses, are sometimes done one eye at a time if Dr. Brinton, your surgeon, deems it necessary. Dr. Brinton will discuss this with you and answer any questions you may have at your Brinton Vision Ocular Analysis (BVOA).

Will you correct both eyes at the same time? 2017-08-18T07:50:11+00:00